3:59 PM

(0) Comments

What Is Belmont Stakes

arie

The Belmont Stakes is an American Grade I stakes race held yearly in June at Belmont Park in Elmont, New York. The race is the third and final leg of the Triple Crown, following five weeks after the Kentucky Derby, and three weeks after the Preakness Stakes. It is a 1.5-mile (2.4 km) thoroughbred horse race for three-year-old colts and geldings carrying a weight of 126 pounds (57 kg) and for fillies with a weight of 121 pounds (55 kg).

The Belmont Stakes is called the "Run for the Carnations" because of the blanket of white carnations that is draped over the winner's neck. Through 1996, the post parade song was "Sidewalks of New York." Beginning in 1997, the audience was invited to sing the Theme from New York, New York following the call to the post. This tradition mirrors the singing of two other songs at the post parades of the first two Triple Crown races, My Old Kentucky Home at the Kentucky Derby and Maryland, My Maryland at the Preakness Stakes.

The first Belmont Stakes was held at Jerome Park Racetrack in The Bronx, built in 1866 by stock market speculator Leonard Jerome (1817–1891) and financed by August Belmont, Sr. (1816–1890) for whom the race was named. The race continued to be held at Jerome Park until 1890 when it was moved to the nearby facility, Morris Park Racecourse. The race remained there until the May 1905 opening of the new Belmont Park, 430 acre (1.7 km²) racetrack in Elmont, New York.

Anti-betting legislation was passed in New York State, closing Belmont and canceling the race for two years between 1911 and 1912.

The first post parade in the United States was at the 14th Belmont, in 1880. Before 1921, the race was run in the clockwise tradition of English racing. Since then, the race has been run in the American or counter-clockwise direction.

Since 1926, a silver bowl, made by Louis Comfort Tiffany and donated by the Belmont family, has been given to the winning owner. Atop the bowl's cover is a silver figure of Fenian, winner of the third running of the Belmont Stakes in 1869. The bowl is supported by three horses - Herod, Eclipse and Matchem, representing the three foundation sires of the thoroughbred world, the Byerly Turk, the Darley Arabian and the Godolphin Barb.

Because of its length (one lap around the enormous Belmont main track), and because it is the final race of the Triple Crown, it is called the "Test of the Champion". Most three-year-olds are unaccustomed to the distance, and lack the experience, if not the stamina, to maintain a winning speed for so long. In a long race such as the Belmont, positioning of the horse and the timing of the move to chase for the lead can be critical.

Due to the reconstruction of Belmont from 1963–1967, the race was held at Aqueduct Racetrack.

Evolution of the Triple Crown series

Since 1931, the order of Triple Crown races has been the Kentucky Derby first, followed by the Preakness Stakes and then the Belmont Stakes. Prior to 1931, eleven times the Preakness was run before the Derby. On May 12, 1917 and again on May 13, 1922, the Preakness and the Derby were run on the same day. On eleven occasions the Belmont Stakes was run before the Preakness Stakes. 

The first official recognition of the Triple Crown was the 1919 series won by Sir Barton.

The Belmont Stakes is held on the first Saturday that falls on or after June 5. The Kentucky Derby is always held on the first Saturday in May; the Preakness Stakes is held two weeks later; and the Belmont Stakes is held three weeks after the Preakness. The earliest possible date for the Derby is May 1, thus the earliest possible date for the Belmont is June 5.

Changes in distance

Run at a mile and five furlongs from 1867 to 1873; a mile and a quarter in 1890, 1891, 1892, 1895, 1904 and 1905; a mile and a furlong in 1893 and 1894; a mile and three furlongs from 1896 to 1903 and from 1906 to 1925. The current distance of a mile and half was established in 1926.

Stakes traditions

Despite the fact that the Belmont Stakes is the oldest of the triple crown races, its traditions have been less venerable and more subject to change. The theme song, which for decades was "The Sidewalks of New York," was changed in 1997 to "New York, New York" in an effort to appeal to younger fans. That same year the official drink was also changed, from the "White Carnation" to the "Belmont Breeze." The New York Times reviewed both cocktails unfavorably, calling the Belmont Breeze "a significant improvement over the nigh undrinkable White Carnation" despite the fact that it "tastes like a refined trashcan punch."

More longstanding are the silver winner's trophy designed by Louis Comfort Tiffany, first presented to a Stakes winner in 1869 and donated by the Belmont family for annual presentation in 1926; and the blanket of white carnations with which the winner is decorated after the race.

Broadcasting history

From 1986 until 2005, the Triple Crown television rights comprised a single package. In late 2004, the New York Racing Association withdrew from that agreement to negotiate independently.


0 Responses to "What Is Belmont Stakes"

Post a Comment